Category Archives: Workforce Planning

CEDA Skills and Workforce Development Forum

By | Vocational Education and Training, Workforce Development, Workforce Planning | No Comments

The CEDA Skills and Workforce Development Forum held on 14 April 2011 in Adelaide focussed on the link between skills, innovation and productivity.

Opened by the Hon Jack Snelling MP, Minister for Employment, Training and Further Education an interesting line up of speakers provided these main messages (as interpreted by Workforce BluePrint):

– Malclom Jackman, CEO Elders Ltd – move towards a high performing organisation, Go 2 client = client focussed sales, recruitment from the widest possible talent pool, challenges in managing a widespread, remote workforce

– Professor Sue Richardson, Principal Research Fellow, NILS, Flinders University – skills depth which is difficult to shift and skills breadth which is more easily transferable, stock of Human Capital = inflows/outflows, depreciation of skills

– Adrian Smith, Chair, SA Training & Skills Commission, Managing Director SYDAC – SA needs a wise investment in skills = evidence based, higher level, qualifications and skills

– Guy Roberts, Managing Director, Penrice Soda Products – moving beyond “stay in business training”, current competencies – target competencies, competency based job descriptions, graduated career ladder; value for money to adding value to creating value; change management – over educate and over communicate

– Chris Wood, Manager Corporate Human Resources and Organisational Development, Santos – huge people challenge with 80 000+ people needed by 2020, 6 years to develop employee to “autonomy”

– Tom Karmel, Managing Director, NCVER – SA against Australia has an over representation of Certificate I’s and II’s, we need higher levels of general education, shortages are about churn they aren’t structural = need for retention stratagies

A whole range of workforce development and planning gaps and issues were raised and I’d like to ask:

What is the number 1 priority for skills and workforce development in South Australia?  What about for your organisation?  What strategies could be implemented to address these issues and gaps?

For those people working on the Skills for All implementation I’d suggest we to:

– undertake a training needs analysis beyond what is on an RTO’s scope and that matches competencies with job roles and organisation capability

– make RPL opt out of not opt in to i.e. all clients/learners undertake an up front RPL process unless they choose not to

– skills development is about foundation, multi-literacies  and transferable skills (breadth) as well as industry and job specific skills (depth)

Overall, South Australia needs an evidence based approach to determining workforce demand for jobs and skills over the short and longer term (for enterprises, industries and regions) – this is the number 1 priority for me.

PS. A statewide skills stock-take would be great too!

Evidence based approach to workforce and client demand

By | Vocational Education and Training, Workforce Development, Workforce Planning, Workforce Projects | No Comments

Increasingly you are being asked to provide evidence of demand for jobs and skills that are linked to your contracts, funding and proposals as well as your programs and services, and that reach specific outcomes and targets.

So how do you,

  1. Make sense of the data on business and industry (I), major projects and regional trends?
  2. Analyse demographics (D) information?
  3. Know who you should partner (P) with?
  4. Examine your client (C) profile?

AND

Marry all 4 areas to identify opportunities for new products and services, develop engagement and support strategies, and provide crucial evidence demonstrating how you can meet demand now and into the future?

Workforce BluePrint has developed a methodology and a process to help you quickly and simply understand the industry (I), demographics (D), partners (P) and your client (C) profile resulting in engagement (E), and support (S) strategies, this is what is looks like:

Workforce Demand

A skills profile (SP) that details foundation skills, transferable skills and industry specific skills plus a competitor analysis (CA) are options you may want to include.

Methodology

–        Action research and collection of data for the specified regions, Local Government Areas (LGA’s) or Employment Service Areas (ESA’s)from a range of national, state/territory, local, major projects, regional and industry sources covering industry workforce demand and social demographics

–        Analysis of your client profile for the location/s

–        Comparison of industry workforce demand profile and social demographics with your client profile

–        Identification of themes in the data and validation of analysis with team members working across the specific locations to value add with local intelligence

–        Partnership map development with local team members

–        Option of skills profile and/or competitor analysis

–        Development of an action plan with priorities, engagement and support strategies and validation by team members

–        Documentation of the whole process so it is repeatable and can be used across your organisation and at other locations/regions.

Outputs per region or location may include:

–        Industry and business workforce profile

–        Social demographics

–        Partnership map

–        Client profile

–        Skills profile

–        Competitor analysis

–        Report and action plan

Get the evidence you need for your business case, tender submission, funding allocations, new program or workforce plan.

Send an email to wendy@workforceblueprint.com.au with the various components that you are interested in – I, D, P, C, SP and/or CA.

Workforce profiling for an island or region

By | Workforce Planning, Workforce Projects | No Comments

Identifying current skills needs by employers in existing employees and their future workforce and profiling the workforce for an island or a region enables better informed decision making and longer term workforce development strategies.

Analysing the results can provide regional and industry development agencies, local networks, government and funding bodies with insight into strengths vs sustainability, community assets and common development needs.

Collect information and data such as numbers employed by industry, age profile, gender, employment status, skill level, advertised vacancies by month, job type, location, skill level and industry.

Ask business owners about their workforce issues and challenges, the skills needs for their employees and themselves and aggregate the results with the most common development needs.

Design a skills profile that includes foundation skills, transferable skills and job specific skills and map to units of competency from National Training Packages with Skillsbook to make formal recognition and the purchase of training and assessment services easier.

Validate the data analysis, skills profile and dig a bit deeper with businesses to understand what is really casing them problems and what solutions could work.

Summarise the results and trends making recommendations that can be implemented by local people with an action plan.

Publish the report, present the information to all stakeholders including the businesses in the survey, follow through with the actions and keep the action plan as a standing item for the local network with projects and funding built from it.

Move towards a workforce plan for the island or region and for each of the organisations by helping them assess the health of their business, provide support, information, education and mentoring.  Work with the businesses on immediate human resource management issues, strategic planning and chat quickly then do.

Paid Parental Leave

By | Human Resource Management, Workforce Planning | No Comments

Australia’s Paid Parental Leave starts on 1 January 2011 with links to relevant websites below:

http://www.familyassist.gov.au/payments/family-assistance-payments/paid-parental-leave-scheme/

Information for employers starts here:

http://www.familyassist.gov.au/payments/family-assistance-payments/paid-parental-leave-scheme/employers–what-will-i-need-to-do.php

Details on eligibility:

http://www.familyassist.gov.au/payments/family-assistance-payments/paid-parental-leave-scheme/working-parents—eligibility.php

Paid Parental Leave Comparison Estimator:

http://www.centrelink.gov.au/internet/internet.nsf/individuals/ppl_working_parents_estimator.htm

Comments in the media:

http://www.theage.com.au/national/paid-parental-leave-the-icing-on-the-cake-for-new-mothers-20110101-19cm3.html

http://www.abc.net.au/7.30/content/2010/s3105655.htm

What do you think?

Updating your workforce plan

By | Workforce Planning | No Comments

Generally when you write a workforce plan you cover the same time frame as the organisation’s strategic plan which could be 1, 3, 5, 10 or 20 years depending on your industry and budget cycles.

I like to review my workforce plan every 6 months or if there has been a major workforce change or refocus of the business.  For our workforce plan from 2009-2012 we are coming up to version number 4 as January 2011 will give us some time to see where we are up to and what we have achieved.

We haven’t changed our vision, mission, goals or values but the details in our strategic priorities have shifted a little bit as we have recently undertaken an exercise to simplify our brands and further segment our target markets.

As job roles change and we implement workforce development strategies, the framework that measures our workforce capability also needs to change and expand and we will revisit our demand and supply forecasting to see if we are on track.

The workforce planning process basically results in identifying strategies and actions to be put in places to bridge the gap between your current and future workforce.  Here’s an easy to use workforce planning template or a  checklist if you have already developed a workforce plan.

Recognition

By | Human Resource Management, Workforce Development, Workforce Planning | One Comment

Yesterday I attended a CEDA luncheon with Hugh Mackay on his new book What makes us tick: The ten desires that drive us.

Hugh covered the ten desires including:

The desire to be taken seriously

The desire for ‘my place’

The desire for something to believe in

The desire to connect

The desire to be useful

The desire to belong

The desire for more

The desire for control

The desire for something to happen

The desire for love

Mackay asserts that the desire to be taken seriously is the most important one, “Not seriously as in ‘Oh what a serious person!’ but seriously as in ‘Please recognise and acknowledge me as an individual.’ (p.2)

So how does this apply to workforce management?  Well I’d suggest this desire relates to every aspect of working effectively with people – recognising their achievements, skills, performance, career aspirations, leadership, issues, ideas, work load, work-life balance and the importance of engaging people in decision making, problem solving and change implementation.  A good reminder really of the need to practice recognising people every day.

So You Think about your Workforce

By | Human Resource Management, Workforce Development, Workforce Planning | No Comments

Today’s result in the 2010 Melbourne Cup with all the hype about So You Think as the absolute favourite (who then came third) goes to show you can’t make assumptions.

Often I get asked these questions – What’s going to happen to our workforce?  Will our key people be leaving soon?  What will help to retain our staff?  Don’t make assumptions about these important answers.

Now I know horses don’t talk, so why don’t you ask your staff what they want, what their plans are into the future and what can you do to retain the people you need for your business success.